An Anglo Indian Chicken Curry cooked according to my Mother’s style..

Anglo Indian ChickenCurry
Ingredients:

  • 1 whole chicken, jointed (or equivalent chicken pieces)
  • 2-3 medium onions
  • 10-12 cloves of garlic
  • Thumb size piece of fresh ginger
  • 2 green chillies
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 3 green cardamon
  • 1 star anise
  • 10-12 peppercorns
  • 4-5 cloves
  • 4 tsps ground coriander
  • 2 tsps cumin
  • 1 tsp tumeric
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp mustard powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp chilli powder
  • 1/2 tsp garam masala
  • 1 Tblsp cider vinegar
  • 1 small piece creamed coconut
  • 2-3 potatoes
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 red pepper
  • 1 bunch fresh coriander

Method:
Fry the whole spices (cinnamon, cardamon, star anise, peppercorns, cloves) in oil for 5 mins
Add the onions, ginger and garlic and fry until soft
Add the chicken and fry for a few mins until slightly browned
Add the powdered spices (coriander, cumin, turmeric, paprika, mustard powder, ginger & garlic powders, chilli powder, garam masala) and fry for a few minutes, also add salt.
Add the cider vinegar for a minute or so, then add enough hot water or chicken stock to cover
Cover and simmer for 20 mins then add the potatoes and coconut, and simmer for another 30-45 mins.
When chicken and potatoes are cooked, add the tomatoes and red pepper.
After 10 minutes add the fresh coriander and serve.

Advertisements

Rabbit Chana Masala Curry

IMG_0152Ingredients:

  • 1 rabbit, skinned, jointed, fried and meat taken off the bone.
  • 1 tin of chick peas
  • 1 large onion
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 1 thumb size price of ginger
  • Small bunch of fresh coriander
  • 1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 3 cardamon pods
  • 2 tsps ground coriander
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp tumeric
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp garam masala
  • 1/2 tsp mango powder (amchor)
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp chilli powder
  • 3 tblsps natural yoghurt
  • 10-12 cherry tomatoes
  • 1 tsp tomato purée
  • Salt

Method:
Fry the mustard seeds and cardamon for a few mins until mustard seeds are popping
Fry the onion.
Make a paste from the ginger, garlic and fresh coriander and add to the frying onion
Add the rest of the powdered spices and salt and fry for a few mins
Add the yoghurt, tomatoes and tomato purée
Add the rabbit and chick peas and simmer for 30-45 mins
Served here with corn tortillas garnished with more fresh coriander

IMG_0150

Chicken and Beetroot Pullao with Rainbow Chard and Radish

Pullao chicken and radish

A thrifty pulloa thrown together from leftover chicken and beetroot curry (see below), with added rainbow chard and radish. Used an extra shallot, 1/2 tsp each of garam masala and tumeric, couple of dessert spoons of yoghurt and a bit more chicken stock. Also some fresh coriander and mint and a squeeze of lime at the end.
Not really poss to write a proper recipe because of the thrift leftover nature of the dish..
The basic rule is always to have about 2:1 liquid to rice though.
Served with chilli poppadums.

Chicken Curry with Beetroot and Tamarind

Chicken Curry with Tamarind and Beetroot

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium onions (approx 200g)
  • 8 cloves garlic (approx 30g)
  • Thumb size piece of ginger (approx 30g)
  • 5 Chicken drumsticks (approx 500g)
  • Cubed fresh Beetroot (approx 250g)
  • 4 cardamon pods
  • 3 one inch pieces cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp fenugreek seeds
  • 3 tsp coriander
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp tumeric
  • 1/2 tsp mustard powder
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper powder
  • 3 red Kashmiri chillies or 2 green chillies
  • 1 tsp tamarind paste
  • 400 ml chicken stock
  • Fresh coriander to garnish

Method:
Fry the whole spices (cardamon, cinnamon and fenugreek) for a couple of minutes in hot oil until they release their aromas.
Add the onion, ginger and garlic and fry until soft (low-medium heat).
Add the rest of the spices and chillies and fry for about a minute (being careful they don’t stick).
Add the chicken and fry in the spices for a few minutes.
Add the chicken stock and the beetroot and tamarind, and simmer partially covered on low for minimum 45 mins until sauce has reached desired consistency .
Garnish with fresh coriander and serve.

Chicken Curry with Beetroot and Tamarind

You Can’t Fake The Hake: A Sri Lankan Style Fish Curry…

Sri Lankan style Hake curry

Hake has to be my favourite fish of all. I think this has something to do with having been on tour so much in Spain, and eating various Catalan Hake dishes outdoors with the heat of the sun offset by an enormous flower pot size jug of ice cold beer, while mopping up the savoury fish juices with the garlicky tomato bread that they serve in that part of the world.
The fish, to me, always has the perfect balance between subtlety of  flavour and firmness of texture, which places it just outside the “delicate white fish” category in my estimation.

So when I saw some nice, firm, fresh looking hake steaks in my local supermarket (a rare event, let me assure you) I snapped it up. As I’d already decided on cooking some sort of Sri Lankan curry that evening, the Hake fitted perfectly into my plans.

Here’s the lowdown:

Serves 2

Ingredients:

  • 4 Hake steaks
  • 1 medium onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 3/4 inch pce of ginger
  • 1 stick of lemon grass
  • 2 greeen chillies
  • 1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 10 curry leaves
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp tumeric
  • 1 tblsp fish sauce
  • 1 tin of coconut milk
  • 1 small bunch fresh coriander
  • 3 -4 cherry tomatoes
  • 1/2 fresh lemon

Method:

Assemble the onion, ginger, garlic, chilli, lemon grass, mustard seeds and spices. Chop as required:

Assemble the ingredients

Heat some oil in a wok. When hot, toss in the mustard seeds. They should spit and splutter.

Toss in the mustard seeds

Next add the curry leaves and lemon grass (which has been bashed and cut in 2 to help release the juices)

Add the curry leaves and lemon grass

Next, add the onions, ginger, garlic and green chillies and stir fry vigorously for a couple of minutes.

Add the onions, ginger, garlic and green chillies

When the onions etc are softened, throw in the powdered spices, fry for 30 secs approx, then add the fish sauce:

Add the spices and fish sauce

When the fish sauce has sizzled for a few seconds, add the coconut milk and bring to a gently simmer:

Add the coconut milk

At this stage it would be good to put the rice on:

Put the rice on

Also at this stage, chop the fresh coriander, tomatoes and ready the lemon. Have your fish prepared as well:

Chop tomatoes, coriander, lemon

Fish at the ready

Place the fish gently into the sauce:

Place the fish into the sauce

Simmer gently for about 10-15 mins until fish is cooked:

Simmer until fish is cooked

At this point add the garnish: Tomatoes, fresh coriander and squeeze in the lemon:

Add the garnish

Now the curry should be ready to serve, with the fish cooked, but still firm:

Fish should be cooked but still firm

Serve with the previously prepared steamed rice:

Serve

Cooking With Gourmet Gorman – Halloween Special…..!

Gourmet Gorman cooks a delicious roasted pumpkin, stuffed with lamb mince and chick pea curry on a terrifying Halloween evening….

A Controversial Kleftico (and it’s illegitimate offspring)

Controversial Kleftico, cooked with Oxtail...

It was a cold and stormy Winter’s night..… OK, it wasn’t. It was actually  an annoyingly rainy and depressingly premature Autumn morning. I was going out to a gig for pretty much the whole day. Luckily though, I’d cunningly foreseen the situation of getting home hungry, wet and weary that evening, so I’d taken the Oxtail that I had in the freezer out to thaw, the night before. My initial intent was to make a curry in the slow cooker, leaving it to cook all day while I was out. However, while flicking through some food photos from my Facebook food group “Foodbook Photos” I came across the Kleftico I made a while ago from a very simple authentic family recipe given to me by a Greek friend. Since it involved rather less preparation than the curry, I settled on the idea of trying to make the Kleftico with the oxtail.

Now I’m aware that proper Kleftico is a lamb dish, and also that there are many variation’s on the recipe, so maybe what I was about to make couldn’t really be called Kleftico (indeed, I had a couple of people on Twitter saying as much), and also that it is made in a conventional oven rather than a slow cooker.
So what I should really call my dish maybe is Greek style oxtail casserole…..? Whatever…!! But it was very nice.

Here’s what I did:

Firstly I set out my oxtail in preparation. It was already chopped into handy chunks:

 

The Oxtail

 

I then sliced up a couple of large onions:

 

Slice the onions

 

And halved some sweet vine ripened tomatoes:

 

Tomatoes

 

I then browned the oxtail off in a frying pan, since it would be going into the slow cooker instead of an oven:

 

Brown the oxtail

 

Next I selected a handful of choice bay leaves:

 

Bay leaves

 

I then layered the onions and the oxtail in the slowcooker:

 

Layer the onions in the pot, and put the oxtail on top

 

To make the cooking liquid I dissolved a tablespoon of tomato puree and some salt in some hot water:

 

Cooking liquid

 

Then arranged the bayleaves and tomatoes in with the oxtail, and poured the liquid into the pot:

 

Arrange everything in the pot

 

Lid went on and I went out for the day:

 

Lid on, me out

 

When I came back, approximately 8 hours later everything seemed to have cooked down nicely:

 

After 8 hours

 

I then gently stirred it, being careful not to break up the oxtail, but making sure to mix the onions up from the bottom:

 

Stirring gently

 

Lid then went back on for another hour or so, then it would be ready for serving.
Before serving it however, I carefully spooned some of the loose fat away that had settled on the top, so it wouldn’t be so rich:

 

Skim off some fat

 

I then squeezed in plenty of lemon juice:

 

Squeeze in plenty of lemon

 

..and served out simply with some mash potato:

 

Serve with mash

 

The flavour was rich, beefy and warming, with that very particular piquancy that you get when mixing tomatoes with lemon (which I also think you get in Madras curries).

Now for the offspring: I had a lot of the stocky cooking liquid left and also quite a lot of meat. So the next day I separated the meat from the bones, and made an oxtail and beetroot curry, simmered in a little of the stock, and served it with with a dhal and vegetable sambar curry and a peas and mushroom saffron pullao.
The leftover meat was rich and gelatinous and was fairly fantastic with the beetroot:

 

Beef and beetroot curry, with a dhal and vegetable sambar curry and a peas and mushroom saffron pullao.

 

…and finally, the next day, I still had quite a lot of stock leftover, so I used it to make a Chilli Con Carne made with smoked chipotle paste, dried homegrown red chillies and Tabasco and served it with corn tortillas. It was quite spectacular, and was easily the best Chilli I’ve ever made…. all down to the rich stock I’m convinced.

 

Chilli made with the last of the oxtail stock, smoked chipotle paste, dried homegrown red chillies and tobasco. Served with corn tortillas.

 

…and the moral of this story is, always buy oxtail, and never listen to pedants 🙂